Principium Volume II, Book 11, Quote 1166, 1170, and 1174

1166. (1-7-2011) …laws that aim at the public good [must] make no distinction of persons…

- Algernon Sydney, 1623-1683 – Works of Algernon Sydney


1170. (1-10-2011) Freedom of men under government is to have a standing rule to live by, common to every one of that society, and made by the legislative power erected in it; a liberty to follow my own will in all things, where that rule prescribes not: and not to be subject to the inconstant, uncertain, arbitrary will of another man.

- John Locke – The Second Treatise on Civil Government, 1689


1174. (1-11-2011) In a free government, these three powers ever have been, at least ever ought to be, kept separate (judicial, legislative, and executive branches of Government)ATJ: because, were all the three, or any two of them, to be united in the same person, the liberties of the people would be, from that moment, ruined. For instance, were the legislative and executive powers united in the same magistrate, or in the same body of magistrates, there could be no such thing as liberty, inasmuch as there would be great reason to fear lest the same monarch, or senate, should enact tyrannical laws in order to execute them in a tyrannical manner. Nor could there, it is evident, be such a thing as liberty, were the judiciary power united either to the legislative or to the executive. In the former case, the life and liberty of the subject would be necessarily exposed to the most imminent danger, because then the same person would be both judge and legislator. In the latter, the condition of the subject would be no less deplorable, for the very same person might pass a cruel sentence in order, perhaps, to execute it with still greater cruelty.

- John Wilkes – The North Briton, Vol. LXIV, 1768

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