Principium Volume II, Book 11, Quote 1148, 1149, and 1150

1148. (1-4-2011) Individual liberty in modern times can hardly be traced back farther than the England of the seventeenth century (1600s)ATJ. It appeared first, as it probably always does, as a by-product of a struggle for power rather than as a result of deliberate aim. (This may be true of men trying to establish liberty without revelation from a prophet. But King Benjamin and King Mosiah, of the Book of Mormon, certainly set up governments under the laws of God that gave men great liberty – not from struggle.)ATJ But it remained long enough for its benefits to be recognized. And for over two hundred years the preservation and perfection of individual liberty became the guiding ideal in that country, and its institutions and traditions the model for the civilized world.

- Friedrich A. Hayek – The Constitution of Liberty, 1978


1149. (1-4-2011) …men of the Middle Ages knew many liberties in the sense of privileges granted to estates or persons, they hardly knew liberty as a general condition of the people. In some respects the general conceptions that prevailed then about the nature and sources of law and order prevented the problem of liberty from arising in its modern form. Yet it might also be said that it was because England retained more of the common medieval ideal of the supremacy of law, which was destroyed elsewhere by the rise of absolutism, that she was able to initiate the modern growth of liberty.

- Friedrich A. Hayek – The Constitution of Liberty, 1978


1150. (1-5-2011) This medieval view, which is profoundly important as back ground for modern developments, though completely accepted only during the early Middle Ages, was that “the state cannot itself create or make law, and of course as little abolish or violate law, because this would mean to abolish justice itself, it would be absurd, a sin, a rebellion against God who alone creates law.” (-O. Vossler)

- Friedrich A. Hayek – The Constitution of Liberty, 1978


(Natural law or rights, law that pertains to all individuals without the granting from some government created by men. Laws, rights, privileges granted to the sons and daughters of a Father in Heaven that would have us live in peace under the order of laws, enjoying freedom and liberty to grow, learn, and experience this life in happiness and fulfillment.)ATJ

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