Principium Volume I, Book 3, Quote 346, 350, 352


346. But neither the common nor the statute law of that (England)ATJ, or of any other nation, ought to be a standard for the proceedings of this, unless previously made its own by legislative adoption.

- James Madison – The Federalist No. 42, 1787-1788


350. The concentrating of [all the powers of government]ATJ in the same hands, is precisely the definition of despotic government. It will be no alleviation, that these powers will be exercised by a plurality of hands, and not by a single one. One hundred and seventy-three despots would surely be as oppressive as one....As little will it avail us, that they are chosen by ourselves. An elective despotism was not the government we fought for; but one which should not only be founded on free principles, but in which the powers of government should be so divided and balanced among several bodies of magistracy, as that no one could transcend their legal limits, without being effectually checked and restrained by the others.

- Thomas Jefferson, 1743-1826 – Notes on the State of Virginia


352. If it be true that all governments rest on opinion, it is no less true that the strength of opinion in each individual, and its practical influence on this conduct, depend much on the number which he supposes to have entertained the same opinion. The reason of man, like man himself, is timid and cautious when left alone, and acquires firmness and confidence in proportion to the number with which it is associated.

- Madison or Hamilton – The Federalist No. 49, 1787-1788

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