Principium Volume I, Book 3, Quote 327, 332, 341

327. Wise politicians will be cautious about fettering the government with restrictions that cannot be observed, because they know that every breach of the fundamental laws, though dictated by necessity, impairs that sacred reverence which ought to be maintained in the breast of rulers towards the constitution of a country, and forms a precedent for other breaches where the same plea of necessity does not exist at all, or is less urgent and palpable.

- Alexander Hamilton – The Federalist No. 25, 1787-1788


332. Constitutions of civil government are not to be framed upon a calculation of existing exigencies, but upon a combination of these with the probable exigencies of ages, according to the natural and tried course of human affairs.

- Alexander Hamilton – The Federalist No. 34, 1787-1788


341. (Speaking of the process of bringing about the Constitution of the United States during the Constitutional Convention.)ATJ The real wonder is that so many difficulties should have been surmounted, and surmounted with a unanimity almost as unprecedented as it must have been unexpected. It is impossible for any man of candor to reflect on this circumstance without partaking of the astonishment. It is impossible for the man of pious reflection not to perceive in it a finger of that Almighty hand which has been so frequently and signally extended to our relief in the critical stages of the revolution.

- James Madison – The Federalist No. 37, 1787-1788

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