Principium Volume I, Book 3, Quote 309, 311, 316

309. The violent destruction of life and property incident to war, the continual effort and alarm attendant on a state of continual danger, will compel nations the most attached to liberty to resort for repose and security to institutions which have a tendency to destroy their civil and political rights. To be more safe, they at length become willing to run the risk of being less free.

- Alexander Hamilton – The Federalist No. 8, 1787-1788


311. The regular distribution of power into distinct departments; the introduction of legislative balances and checks; the institution of courts composed of judges holding their offices during good behavior; the representation of the people in the legislature by deputies of their own election: these are wholly new discoveries, or have made their principal progress towards perfection in modern times. They are means, and powerful means, by which the excellences of republican government may be retained and its imperfections lessened or avoided.

- Alexander Hamilton – The Federalist No. 9, 1787-1788


316. Government implies the power of making laws. It is essential to the idea of a law, that it be attended with a sanction; or, in other words, a penalty or punishment for disobedience. If there be no resolutions or commands which pretend to be laws will, in fact, amount to nothing more than advice or recommendation.

- Alexander Hamilton – The Federalist No. 15, 1787-1788

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